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Title: Developing a Culturally Adaptive Pathway to Success
The financial disadvantage of many students in the College of Engineering, Computer Science, and Technology (ECST) at California State University, Los Angeles, is often in parallel with inadequate academic preparation through K-12 education and limited family guidance. Hence, many students, including those who are academically-talented, experience significant challenges in achieving their academic goals. In 2018, the College of ECST received an award from NSF SSTEM program to establish a Culturally Adaptive Pathway to Success (CAPS) program that aims to build an inclusive pathway to accelerate the graduation for academically talented, lowincome students in Engineering and Computer Science majors. CAPS focuses on progressively developing students’ social and career competence via three integrated interventions: (1) Mentor+, relationally informed advising that encourages students to see their academic work in relation to their families and communities; (2) peer cohorts, providing social support structure for students and enhancing their sense of belongings in engineering and computer science classrooms and beyond; and (3) professional development with difference-education, illuminating the hidden curricula that may disadvantage first-generation and low income students. This paper presents our progress and core program activities during the first year of the CAPS program, including the recruitment process and mentor training program. In Fall more » 18, group and individual mentoring sessions have taken place following the culturally responsive mentoring strategy. In addition to program activities, the paper will also share the data collected through focus groups and report the lessons learned during the first-year implementation phase. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1742614
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10165796
Journal Name:
ASEE Annual Conference & Exposition
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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