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Title: Exploring Eye Gaze Visualization Techniques for Identifying Distracted Students in Educational VR
Virtual Reality (VR) headsets with embedded eye trackers are appearing as consumer devices (e.g. HTC Vive Eye, FOVE). These devices could be used in VR-based education (e.g., a virtual lab, a virtual field trip) in which a live teacher guides a group of students. The eye tracking could enable better insights into students’ activities and behavior patterns. For real-time insight, a teacher’s VR environment can display student eye gaze. These visualizations would help identify students who are confused/distracted, and the teacher could better guide them to focus on important objects. We present six gaze visualization techniques for a VR-embedded teacher’s view, and we present a user study to compare these techniques. The results suggest that a short particle trail representing eye trajectory is promising. In contrast, 3D heatmaps (an adaptation of traditional 2D heatmaps) for visualizing gaze over a short time span are problematic.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1815976
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10168890
Journal Name:
2020 IEEE Conference on Virtual Reality and 3D User Interfaces (VR)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
868 to 877
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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