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Title: Collaborative or Simply Uncaged? Understanding Human-Cobot Interactions in Automation
Collaborative robots, or cobots, represent a breakthrough technology designed for high-level (e.g., collaborative) interactions between workers and robots with capabilities for flexible deployment in industries such as manufacturing. Understanding how workers and companies use and integrate cobots is important to inform the future design of cobot systems and educational technologies that facilitate effective worker-cobot interaction. Yet, little is known about typical training for collaboration and the application of cobots in manufacturing. To close this gap, we interviewed nine experts in manufacturing about their experience with cobots. Our thematic analysis revealed that, contrary to the envisioned use, experts described most cobot applications as only low-level (e.g., pressing start/stop buttons) interactions with little flexible deployment, and experts felt traditional robotics skills were needed for collaborative and flexible interaction with cobots. We conclude with design recommendations for improved future robots, including programming and interface designs, and educational technologies to support collaborative use.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1822872
NSF-PAR ID:
10175170
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
CHI '20: Proceedings of the 2020 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1 to 12
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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