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Title: Methodologies to mitigate wind-induced vibration of tall buildings: A state-of-the-art review
This paper reviews the state-of-the-art and –practice on various methodologies developed to control the wind-induced vibration of tall buildings. Tall buildings experience wind-induced vibration in the along- and across-wind directions depending on the wind direction, building shape, height, and structural properties. It is possible to control the wind response of buildings through passive, active, and semi-active systems. Damping systems, which are widely used to reduce the structural vibrations, are reviewed, and their performance in alleviating the building vibration is discussed. It was found that the application of conventional dampers needs to be reassessed to ensure their efficiency in dissipating the energy, especially caused by wind loads. Specific attention has been given to the aerodynamic modification of building shapes considering their effectiveness and high popularity within the wind engineering community. A comprehensive review of the existing wind tunnel experiment and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) studies are conducted here to present the past and recent achievements on the response mitigation of tall buildings. A comparative study on the performance of different systems has been provided that can provide a commencing point for future studies. The existing challenges and their solutions are explained, and suggestions for future studies are proposed. It is expected more » that the information provided in this paper will facilitate further research in the area of wind-induced vibration mitigation approaches of tall buildings. « less
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1827774 1826356
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10176381
Journal Name:
Journal of building engineering
ISSN:
2352-7102
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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