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Title: A scientist like me: demographic analysis of biology textbooks reveals both progress and long-term lags
Textbooks shape teaching and learning in introductory biology and highlight scientists as potential role models who are responsible for significant discoveries. We explore a potential demographic mismatch between the scientists featured in textbooks and the students who use textbooks to learn core concepts in biology. We conducted a demographic analysis by extracting hundreds of human names from common biology textbooks and assessing the binary gender and race of featured scientists. We found that the most common scientists featured in textbooks are white men. However, women and scientists of colour are increasingly represented in contemporary scientific discoveries. In fact, the proportion of women highlighted in textbooks has increased in lockstep with the proportion of women in the field, indicating that textbooks are matching a changing demographic landscape. Despite these gains, the scientists portrayed in textbooks are not representative of their target audience—the student population. Overall, very few scientists of colour were highlighted, and projections suggest it could take multiple centuries at current rates before we reach inclusive representation. We call upon textbook publishers to expand upon the scientists they highlight to reflect the diverse population of learners in biology.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1831164
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10177617
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume:
287
Issue:
1929
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
20200877
ISSN:
0962-8452
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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