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Title: Ionic liquids of superior thermal stability. Validation of PPh 4 + as an organic cation of impressive thermodynamic durability
Recent work by Wasserscheid, et al. suggests that PPh 4 + is an organic molecular ion of truly exceptional thermal stability. Herein we provide data that cements that conclusion: specifically, we show that aliphatic moieties of modified PPh 4 + -based cations incorporating methyl, methylene, or methine C–H bonds burn away at high temperatures in the presence of oxygen, forming CO, CO 2 , and water, leaving behind the parent ion PPh 4 + . The latter then undergoes no further reaction, at least below 425 °C.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1800122
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10180414
Journal Name:
RSC Advances
Volume:
10
Issue:
35
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
20521 to 20528
ISSN:
2046-2069
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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