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Title: The low density and magnetization of a massive galaxy halo exposed by a fast radio burst
Present-day galaxies are surrounded by cool and enriched halo gas extending for hundreds of kiloparsecs. This halo gas is thought to be the dominant reservoir of material available to fuel future star formation, but direct constraints on its mass and physical properties have been difficult to obtain. We report the detection of a fast radio burst (FRB 181112), localized with arcsecond precision, that passes through the halo of a foreground galaxy. Analysis of the burst shows that the halo gas has low net magnetization and turbulence. Our results imply predominantly diffuse gas in massive galactic halos, even those hosting active supermassive black holes, contrary to some previous results.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1911140 1910471
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10182753
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
366
Issue:
6462
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
231 to 234
ISSN:
0036-8075
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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