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Title: Creating Asynchronous Virtual Field Experiences with 360 Video
The global COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted normal face-to-face classes across institutions. This has significantly impacted methods courses where preservice teachers (PSTs) practice pedagogy in the field (e.g., in the PreK-12 classroom). In this paper, we describe efforts to adapt an assignment originally situated in a face-to-face school placement into a virtual version. By utilizing multi-perspective 360 video, preliminary results suggest virtual field experiences can provide PSTs with similar experiences for observation-based assignments. Acknowledging that immersive virtual experiences are not a complete replacement for face-to-face field-based experiences, we suggest virtual field assignments can be a useful supplement or a viable alternative during a time of the pandemic.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1908159
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10182900
Journal Name:
Journal of technology and teacher education
Volume:
28
Issue:
2
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
315-320
ISSN:
1943-5924
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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