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Title: Developing Pedagogical Practices That Support Disciplinary Practices When Integrating Computer Science Into Elementary School Curriculum
There is a growing movement seeking to promote Computer Science (CS) and Computational Thinking (CT) across K-8 education. While advantageous for supporting student learning through engaging in complex and interdisciplinary learning, integrating CS/CT into the elementary school curriculum can pose curricular and pedagogical challenges. For one, teachers themselves must understand the concepts and disciplinary practices associated with CS/CT and the other content areas being integrated, as well as develop a related pedagogical repertoire. This study addresses how two 3rd grade teachers made sense of the intersection of disciplinary practices and pedagogical practices to support student learning. We present preliminary findings from a Research-Practice Partnership that worked with elementary teachers to integrate aspects of CS/CT practice into existing content areas. We identified two main disciplinary activities that drove their curriculum design and pedagogical practices: (1) the importance of productive frustration and failure; and (2) the importance of precision
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1837086
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10185658
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on the Learning Sciences
Volume:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2289-2292
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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