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Title: CYBER-PHYSICAL SECURITY OF AIR TRAFFIC SURVEILLANCE SYSTEMS
Cyber-physical system security is a significant concern in the critical infrastructure. Strong interdependencies between cyber and physical components render cyber-physical systems highly susceptible to integrity attacks such as injecting malicious data and projecting fake sensor measurements. Traditional security models partition cyber-physical systems into just two domains – high and low. This absolute partitioning is not well suited to cyber-physical systems because they comprise multiple overlapping partitions. Information flow properties, which model how inputs to a system affect its outputs across security partitions, are important considerations in cyber-physical systems. Information flows support traceability analysis that helps detect vulnerabilities and anomalous sources, contributing to the implementation of mitigation measures. This chapter describes an automated model with graph-based information flow traversal for identifying information flow paths in the Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) system used in civilian aviation, and subsequently partitioning the flows into security domains. The results help identify ADS-B system vulnerabilities to failures and attacks, and determine potential mitigation measures.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1837472
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10189011
Journal Name:
Critical Infrastructure Protection XIV
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
207-226
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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