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Title: Electrically driven optical interferometry with spins in silicon carbide
Interfacing solid-state defect electron spins to other quantum systems is an ongoing challenge. The ground-state spin’s weak coupling to its environment not only bestows excellent coherence properties but also limits desired drive fields. The excited-state orbitals of these electrons, however, can exhibit stronger coupling to phononic and electric fields. Here, we demonstrate electrically driven coherent quantum interference in the optical transition of single, basally oriented divacancies in commercially available 4H silicon carbide. By applying microwave frequency electric fields, we coherently drive the divacancy’s excited-state orbitals and induce Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference fringes in the resonant optical absorption spectrum. In addition, we find remarkably coherent optical and spin subsystems enabled by the basal divacancy’s symmetry. These properties establish divacancies as strong candidates for quantum communication and hybrid system applications, where simultaneous control over optical and spin degrees of freedom is paramount.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1641099
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10192073
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
5
Issue:
11
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eaay0527
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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