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Title: Large-scale sequence comparisons with sourmash
The sourmash software package uses MinHash-based sketching to create “signatures”, compressed representations of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences, that can be stored, searched, explored, and taxonomically annotated. sourmash signatures can be used to estimate sequence similarity between very large data sets quickly and in low memory, and can be used to search large databases of genomes for matches to query genomes and metagenomes. sourmash is implemented in C++, Rust, and Python, and is freely available under the BSD license at http://github.com/dib-lab/sourmash.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1711984
NSF-PAR ID:
10192442
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
F1000Research
Volume:
8
ISSN:
2046-1402
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1006
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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