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Title: Real Data and Application based Data Science Education in Engineering
The democratization of data is transforming our world. Together with the advances in computer and engineering technology, these advancements drive the rapid change in the landscape of jobs and work. There are many reports indicating that industry finds itself constrained by today’s relatively small supply of well-trained data science talent, and hiring demand for data scientists has begun to increase rapidly; some projections forecast that approximately 2.7 million new data science positions will be available by 2020. Unsurprisingly, the data science and engineering (DSE) programs across the nation have grown significantly in the past a few years. DSE education requires both appropriate classwork and hands-on experience with real data and real applications. While significant progress has been made in the former, one key aspect that yet to be addressed is hands-on experience incorporating real-world applications. In this work, we will review the efforts that explore real data and application based data science education.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1933873
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10193608
Journal Name:
Proceedings of 2020 ASEE-SE Conference
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
Paper no. 46
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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