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Title: Pressure-induced suppression of ferromagnetism in CePd2P2
The correlated electron material CePd2P2 crystallizes in the ThCr2Si2 structure and orders ferromagnetically at 29 K. Prior work by Lai et al. [Phys. Rev. B 97, 224406 (2018)] found evidence for a ferromagnetic quantum critical point induced by chemical compression via substitution of Ni for Pd. However, disorder effects due to the chemical substitution interfere with a simple analysis of the possible critical behavior. In the present paper, we examine the temperature—pressure—magnetic-field phase diagram of single crystalline CePd2P2 to 25 GPa using a combination of resistivity, magnetic susceptibility, and x-ray diffraction measurements. We find that the ferromagnetism appears to be destroyed near 12 GPa, without any change in the crystal structure.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1453752
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10194285
Journal Name:
Physical review
Volume:
102
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
125146
ISSN:
2469-9950
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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