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Title: Your Noise, My Signal: Exploiting Switching Noise for Stealthy Data Exfiltration from Desktop Computers?
Award ID(s):
1910208 1610471 1551661
NSF-PAR ID:
10195211
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
ACM SIGMETRICS Performance Evaluation Review
Volume:
48
Issue:
1
ISSN:
0163-5999
Page Range / eLocation ID:
79 to 80
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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