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Title: Design of a Cyberattack Resilient 77 GHz Automotive Radar Sensor
In this paper, we propose a novel 77 GHz automotive radar sensor, and demonstrate its cyberattack resilience using real measurements. The proposed system is built upon a standard Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar RF-front end, and the novelty is in the DSP algorithm used at the firmware level. All attack scenarios are based on real radar signals generated by Texas Instruments AWR series 77 GHz radars, and all measurements are done using the same radar family. For sensor networks, including interconnected autonomous vehicles sharing radar measurements, cyberattacks at the network/communication layer is a known critical problem, and has been addressed by several different researchers. What is addressed in this paper is cyberattacks at the physical layer, that is, adversarial agents generating 77 GHz electromagnetic waves which may cause a false target detection, false distance/velocity estimation, or not detecting an existing target. The main algorithm proposed in this paper is not a predictive filtering based cyberattack detection scheme where an “unusual” difference between measured and predicted values triggers an alarm. The core idea is based on a kind of physical challenge-response authentication, and its integration into the radar DSP firmware.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1919855
NSF-PAR ID:
10195406
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Electronics
Volume:
9
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2079-9292
Page Range / eLocation ID:
573
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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