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Title: Advances in neural information processing systems
This paper extends robust principal component analysis (RPCA) to nonlinear manifolds. Suppose that the observed data matrix is the sum of a sparse component and a component drawn from some low dimensional manifold. Is it possible to separate them by using similar ideas as RPCA? Is there any benefit in treating the manifold as a whole as opposed to treating each local region independently? We answer these two questions affirmatively by proposing and analyzing an optimization framework that separates the sparse component from the manifold under noisy data. Theoretical error bounds are provided when the tangent spaces of the manifold satisfy certain incoherence conditions. We also provide a near optimal choice of the tuning parameters for the proposed optimization formulation with the help of a new curvature estimation method. The efficacy of our method is demonstrated on both synthetic and real datasets.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1909523
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10195511
Journal Name:
Advances in neural information processing systems
Volume:
32
ISSN:
1049-5258
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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