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Title: A Federated Learning Approach to Routing in Challenged SDN-Enabled Edge Networks
The edge computing paradigm allows computationally intensive tasks to be offloaded from small devices to nearby (more) powerful servers, via an edge network. The intersection between such edge computing paradigm and Machine Learning (ML), in general, and deep learning in particular, has brought to light several advantages for network operators: from automating management tasks, to gain additional insights on their networks. Most of the existing approaches that use ML to drive routing and traffic control decisions are valuable but rarely focus on challenged networks, that are characterized by continually varying network conditions and the high volume of traffic generated by edge devices. In particular, recently proposed distributed ML-based architectures require either a long synchronization phase or a training phase that is unsustainable for challenged networks. In this paper, we fill this knowledge gap with Blaster, a federated architecture for routing packets within a distributed edge network, to improve the application's performance and allow scalability of data-intensive applications. We also propose a novel path selection model that uses Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) to predict the optimal route. Finally, we present some initial results obtained by testing our approach via simulations and with a prototype deployed over the GENI testbed. By leveraging a Federated Learning (FL) model, our approach shows that we can optimize the communication between SDN controllers, preserving bandwidth for the data traffic.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1836906 1908574 1647084
NSF-PAR ID:
10196701
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
2020 6th IEEE Conference on Network Softwarization (NetSoft)
Page Range / eLocation ID:
150 to 154
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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