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Title: Networked experiments and modeling for producing collective identity in a group of human subjects using an iterative abduction framework
Group or collective identity is an individual’s cognitive, moral, and emotional connection with a broader community, category, practice, or institution. There are many different contexts in which collective identity operates, and a host of application domains where collective identity is important. Collective identity is studied across myriad academic disciplines. Consequently, there is interest in understanding the collective identity formation process. In laboratory and other settings, collective identity is fostered through priming a group of human subjects. However, there have been no works in developing agent-based models for simulating collective identity formation processes. Our focus is understanding a game that is designed to produce collective identity within a group. To study this process, we build an online game platform; perform and analyze controlled laboratory experiments involving teams; build, exercise, and evaluate network-based agent-based models; and form and evaluate hypotheses about collective identity. We conduct these steps in multiple abductive iterations of experiments and modeling to improve our understanding of collective identity as this looping process unfolds. Our work serves as an exemplar of using abductive looping in the social sciences. Findings on collective identity include the observation that increased team performance in the game, resulting in increased monetary earnings for all more » players, did not produce a measured increase in collective identity among them. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1916670
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10203851
Journal Name:
Social network analysis and mining
Volume:
10
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1-43
ISSN:
1869-5469
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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