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Title: Ecological insights from three decades of animal movement tracking across a changing Arctic
The Arctic is entering a new ecological state, with alarming consequences for humanity. Animal-borne sensors offer a window into these changes. Although substantial animal tracking data from the Arctic and subarctic exist, most are difficult to discover and access. Here, we present the new Arctic Animal Movement Archive (AAMA), a growing collection of more than 200 standardized terrestrial and marine animal tracking studies from 1991 to the present. The AAMA supports public data discovery, preserves fundamental baseline data for the future, and facilitates efficient, collaborative data analysis. With AAMA-based case studies, we document climatic influences on the migration phenology of eagles, geographic differences in the adaptive response of caribou reproductive phenology to climate change, and species-specific changes in terrestrial mammal movement rates in response to increasing temperature.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1564380 1915347
NSF-PAR ID:
10205028
Author(s) / Creator(s):
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Date Published:
Journal Name:
Science
Volume:
370
Issue:
6517
ISSN:
0036-8075
Page Range / eLocation ID:
712 to 715
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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