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Title: Robust component: a robustness measure that incorporates access to critical facilities under disruptions
The objective of this paper is to integrate the post-disaster network access to critical facilities into the network robustness assessment, considering the geographical exposure of infrastructure to natural hazards. Conventional percolation modelling that uses generating function to measure network robustness fails to characterize spatial networks due to the degree correlation. In addition, the giant component alone is not sufficient to represent the performance of transportation networks in the post-disaster setting, especially in terms of the access to critical facilities (i.e. emergency services). Furthermore, the failure probability of various links in the face of different hazards needs to be encapsulated in simulation. To bridge this gap, this paper proposed the metric robust component and a probabilistic link-removal strategy to assess network robustness through a percolation-based simulation framework. A case study has been conducted on the Portland Metro road network during an M9.0 earthquake scenario. The results revealed how the number of critical facilities severely impacts network robustness. Besides, earthquake-induced failures led to a two-phase percolation transition in robustness performance. The proposed robust component metric and simulation scheme can be generalized into a wide range of scenarios, thus enabling engineers to pinpoint the impact of disastrous disruption on network robustness. This research more » can also be generalized to identify critical facilities and sites for future development. « less
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1826407
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10205041
Journal Name:
Journal of The Royal Society Interface
Volume:
16
Issue:
157
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
20190149
ISSN:
1742-5689
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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