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Title: Experimental and theoretical P-V-T equation of state for Os 2 B 3
Thermoelastic behavior of transition metal boride Os2B3 was studied under quasi-hydrostatic and isothermal conditions in a Paris-Edinburgh cell to 5.4 GPa and 1273 K. In-situ Energy Dispersive X-ray diffraction was used to determine interplanar spacings of the hexagonal crystal structure and thus the volume and axial compression. P-V-T data were fitted to a 3rd Order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state with a temperature modification to determine thermal elastic constants. The bulk modulus was shown to be K0 = 402 ± 21 GPa when the first pressure derivative was held to K0’ = 4.0 from the room temperature P-V curve. Under a quadratic fit α=α_0+α_1 T-α_2 T^(-2), the thermal expansion coefficients were determined to be α_0=1.862×10^(-5) K-1, α_1=0.841×10^(-9) K-2, and α_2=-0.525 K. Density functional theory (DFT) with the quasi-harmonic approximation (QHA) were further employed to study Os2B3, including its P-V-T curves, phonon spectra, bulk modulus, specific heat, thermal expansion, and the Grüneisen parameter. A good agreement between the first-principle theory and experimental observations was achieved, highlighting the success of the Armiento-Mattsson 2005 generalized gradient approximation functional employed in this study and QHA for describing thermodynamic properties of Os2B3.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1904164
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10207502
Journal Name:
High Pressure Research
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1 to 12
ISSN:
0895-7959
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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