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Title: Revisiting Huffman Coding: Toward Extreme Performance on Modern GPU Architectures
Today's high-performance computing (HPC) applications are producing vast volumes of data, which are challenging to store and transfer efficiently during the execution, such that data compression is becoming a critical technique to mitigate the storage burden and data movement cost. Huffman coding is arguably the most efficient Entropy coding algorithm in information theory, such that it could be found as a fundamental step in many modern compression algorithms such as DEFLATE. On the other hand, today's HPC applications are more and more relying on the accelerators such as GPU on supercomputers, while Huffman encoding suffers from low throughput on GPUs, resulting in a significant bottleneck in the entire data processing. In this paper, we propose and implement an efficient Huffman encoding approach based on modern GPU architectures, which addresses two key challenges: (1) how to parallelize the entire Huffman encoding algorithm, including codebook construction, and (2) how to fully utilize the high memory-bandwidth feature of modern GPU architectures. The detailed contribution is four-fold. (1) We develop an efficient parallel codebook construction on GPUs that scales effectively with the number of input symbols. (2) We propose a novel reduction based encoding scheme that can efficiently merge the codewords on GPUs. (3) We optimize the overall GPU performance by leveraging the state-of-the-art CUDA APIs such as Cooperative Groups. (4) We evaluate our Huffman encoder thoroughly using six real-world application datasets on two advanced GPUs and compare with our implemented multi-threaded Huffman encoder. Experiments show that our solution can improve the encoding throughput by up to 5.0x and 6.8x on NVIDIA RTX 5000 and V100, respectively, over the state-of-the-art GPU Huffman encoder, and by up to 3.3x over the multi-thread encoder on two 28-core Xeon Platinum 8280 CPUs.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2034169 2042084 2003624 1948447 2003709 2303820 2303064
NSF-PAR ID:
10208328
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
The 35th IEEE International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium (IPDPS 2021)
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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