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Title: PREEMPT: Scalable Epidemic Interventions Using Submodular Optimization on Multi-GPU Systems
Preventing and slowing the spread of epidemics is achieved through techniques such as vaccination and social distancing. Given practical limitations on the number of vaccines and cost of administration, optimization becomes a necessity. Previous approaches using mathematical programming methods have shown to be effective but are limited by computational costs. In this work, we present PREEMPT, a new approach for intervention via maximizing the influence of vaccinated nodes on the network.We prove submodular properties associated with the objective function of our method so that it aids in construction of an efficient greedy approximation strategy. Consequently, we present a new parallel algorithm based on greedy hill climbing for PREEMPT, and present an efficient parallel implementation for distributed CPU-GPU heterogeneous platforms. Our results demonstrate that PREEMPT is able to achieve a significant reduction (up to 6:75) in the percentage of people infected and up to 98% reduction in the peak of the infection on a cityscale network. We also show strong scaling results of PREEMPT on up to 128 nodes of the Summit supercomputer. Our parallel implementation is able to significantly reduce time to solution, from hours to minutes on large networks. This work represents a first-of-its-kind effort in parallelizing greedy hill climbing and applying it toward devising effective interventions for epidemics.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1918656 1633028
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10213737
Journal Name:
International Conference for High Performance Computing Networking Storage and Analysis
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
765-799
ISSN:
2167-4337
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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