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Title: Evolution of similar configurations in graph dynamical systems
We investigate questions related to the time evolution of discrete graph dynamical systems where each node has a state from {0,1}. The configuration of a system at any time instant is a Boolean vector that specifies the state of each node at that instant. We say that two configurations are similar if the Hamming distance between them is small. Also, a predecessor of a configuration B is a configuration A such that B can be reached in one step from A. We study problems related to the similarity of predecessor configurations from which two similar configurations can be reached in one time step. We address these problems both analytically and experimentally. Our analytical results point out that the level of similarity between predecessors of two similar configurations depends on the local functions of the dynamical system. Our experimental results, which consider random graphs as well as small world networks, rely on the fact that the problem of finding predecessors can be reduced to the Boolean Satisfiability problem (SAT).
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1443054 1633028 1745207 1916805 1918656
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10213757
Journal Name:
International Conference on Complex Networks and Their Applications
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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