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Title: Deforestation and land use and land cover changes in protected areas of the Brazilian Cerrado: impacts on the fire-driven emissions of fine particulate aerosols pollutants
Award ID(s):
1950080
NSF-PAR ID:
10217378
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Remote Sensing Letters
Volume:
12
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2150-704X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
79 to 92
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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