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Title: On the Periodicity of Random Walks in Dynamic Networks
We investigate random walks in graphs whose edges change over time as a function of the current probability distribution of the walk. We show that such systems can be chaotic and can exhibit ``hyper-torpid" mixing. Our main result is that, if each graph is strongly connected, then the dynamics is asymptotically periodic almost surely.
Authors:
Editors:
Cao, X.
Award ID(s):
2006125
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10219983
Journal Name:
IEEE transactions on network science and engineering
Volume:
7
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
1337 - 1343
ISSN:
2327-4697
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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