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Title: An all-epitaxial nitride heterostructure with concurrent quantum Hall effect and superconductivity
Creating seamless heterostructures that exhibit the quantum Hall effect and superconductivity is highly desirable for future electronics based on topological quantum computing. However, the two topologically robust electronic phases are typically incompatible owing to conflicting magnetic field requirements. Combined advances in the epitaxial growth of a nitride superconductor with a high critical temperature and a subsequent nitride semiconductor heterostructure of metal polarity enable the observation of clean integer quantum Hall effect in the polarization-induced two-dimensional (2D) electron gas of the high-electron mobility transistor. Through individual magnetotransport measurements of the spatially separated GaN 2D electron gas and superconducting NbN layers, we find a small window of magnetic fields and temperatures in which the epitaxial layers retain their respective quantum Hall and superconducting properties. Its analysis indicates that in epitaxial nitride superconductor/semiconductor heterostructures, this window can be significantly expanded, creating an industrially viable platform for robust quantum devices that exploit topologically protected transport.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1741694
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10221300
Journal Name:
Science Advances
Volume:
7
Issue:
8
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
eabf1388
ISSN:
2375-2548
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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