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Title: AiRobSim: Simulating a Multisensor Aerial Robot for Urban Search and Rescue Operation and Training
Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), equipped with a variety of sensors, are being used to provide actionable information to augment first responders’ situational awareness in disaster areas for urban search and rescue (SaR) operations. However, existing aerial robots are unable to sense the occluded spaces in collapsed structures, and voids buried in disaster rubble that may contain victims. In this study, we developed a framework, AiRobSim, to simulate an aerial robot to acquire both aboveground and underground information for post-disaster SaR. The integration of UAV, ground-penetrating radar (GPR), and other sensors, such as global navigation satellite system (GNSS), inertial measurement unit (IMU), and cameras, enables the aerial robot to provide a holistic view of the complex urban disaster areas. The robot-collected data can help locate critical spaces under the rubble to save trapped victims. The simulation framework can serve as a virtual training platform for novice users to control and operate the robot before actual deployment. Data streams provided by the platform, which include maneuver commands, robot states and environmental information, have potential to facilitate the understanding of the decision-making process in urban SaR and the training of future intelligent SaR robots.
Authors:
; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1850008
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10221533
Journal Name:
Sensors
Volume:
20
Issue:
18
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5223
ISSN:
1424-8220
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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