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Title: The Solar Orbiter magnetometer
The magnetometer instrument on the Solar Orbiter mission is designed to measure the magnetic field local to the spacecraft continuously for the entire mission duration. The need to characterise not only the background magnetic field but also its variations on scales from far above to well below the proton gyroscale result in challenging requirements on stability, precision, and noise, as well as magnetic and operational limitations on both the spacecraft and other instruments. The challenging vibration and thermal environment has led to significant development of the mechanical sensor design. The overall instrument design, performance, data products, and operational strategy are described.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1655280
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10221586
Journal Name:
Astronomy & Astrophysics
Volume:
642
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
A9
ISSN:
0004-6361
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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