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Title: Changes in practicing secondary teachers’ professional noticing over a long-term professional development program
Much of the research on the development of professional noticing expertise has focused on prospective teachers. We contend that we must investigate practicing teachers as well, and in particular practicing secondary teachers, because they bring with them years of teaching experience and are situated in unique contexts. Hence we studied the longitudinal growth of the professional- noticing expertise of a group of practicing secondary teachers (N=10) as they progressed through a 5-year professional development (PD) about being responsive to students’ mathematical thinking. Results indicated that the first half of the PD supported their interpreting and deciding-how-to- respond skills, and the second half of the PD supported their attending skills, which were already strong even before the PD. We compare these results with the activities that occurred in the PD and discuss implications for future research and PD programs.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1240127
NSF-PAR ID:
10222514
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Editor(s):
Sacristán, A.I.; Cortés-Zavala, J.C.; & Ruiz-Arias, P.M.
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the 42nd Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education
Volume:
Sacristán, A.I., Cortés-Zavala, J.C. & Ruiz-Arias, P.M.
Page Range / eLocation ID:
1818 to 1827
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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