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Title: Synthetic approaches for copolymers containing nucleic acids and analogues: challenges and opportunities
Deep integration of nucleic acids with other classes of materials has become the basis of many useful technologies. Among these biohybrids, nucleic acid-containing copolymers have seen rapid development in both chemistry and applications. This review focuses on the various synthetic approaches for accessing nucleic acid–polymer biohybrids spanning post-polymerization conjugation, nucleic acids in polymerization, solid-phase synthesis, and nucleoside/nucleobase-functionalized polymers. We highlight the challenges associated with working with nucleic acids with each approach and the ingenuity of the solutions, with the hope of lowering the entry barrier and inspiring further investigations in this exciting area.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
2004947
NSF-PAR ID:
10225738
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Polymer Chemistry
Volume:
12
Issue:
15
ISSN:
1759-9954
Page Range / eLocation ID:
2193 to 2204
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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