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Title: Poly(ADP-ribose) binding and macroH2A mediate recruitment and functions of KDM5A at DNA lesions

The histone demethylase KDM5A erases histone H3 lysine 4 methylation, which is involved in transcription and DNA damage responses (DDRs). While DDR functions of KDM5A have been identified, how KDM5A recognizes DNA lesion sites within chromatin is unknown. Here, we identify two factors that act upstream of KDM5A to promote its association with DNA damage sites. We have identified a noncanonical poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)–binding region unique to KDM5A. Loss of the PAR-binding region or treatment with PAR polymerase (PARP) inhibitors (PARPi’s) blocks KDM5A–PAR interactions and DNA repair functions of KDM5A. The histone variant macroH2A1.2 is also specifically required for KDM5A recruitment and function at DNA damage sites, including homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and repression of transcription at DNA breaks. Overall, this work reveals the importance of PAR binding and macroH2A1.2 in KDM5A recognition of DNA lesion sites that drive transcriptional and repair activities at DNA breaks within chromatin that are essential for maintaining genome integrity.

Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1715370
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10229080
Journal Name:
Journal of Cell Biology
Volume:
220
Issue:
7
ISSN:
0021-9525
Publisher:
DOI PREFIX: 10.1083
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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