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Title: EVALUATION OF bi-PASS FOR PARALLEL SIMULATION OPTIMIZATION
Cheap parallel computing has greatly extended the reach of ranking & selection (R&S) for simulation optimization. In this paper we present an evaluation of bi-PASS, a R&S procedure created specifically for parallel implementation and very large numbers of system designs. We compare bi-PASS to the state-ofthe- art Good Selection Procedure and an easy-to-implement subset selection procedure. This is one of the few papers to consider both computational and statistical comparison of parallel R&S procedures.
Authors:
; ;
Editors:
Bae, K-H; Feng, B; Kim, S; Lazarova-Molnar, S; Zheng, Z; Roeder, T; Thiesing, R
Award ID(s):
1854562
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10233324
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Winter Simulation Conference
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
2960-2971
ISSN:
1558-4305
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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