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Title: Report on the 2019 Lattice Diversity and Inclusivity Survey.
We report on the results of a survey to assess diversity and inclusivity in the Lattice community as one of the duties of a newly formed Committee on Diversity and Inclusivity in the Lattice community.
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1653405
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10248816
Journal Name:
37th International Symposium on Lattice Field Theory (Lattice 2019)
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
295
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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