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Title: Protocols for Rearing FallWebworm (Hyphantria cunea) in a Colony and Basic Methods for Laboratory and Field Experiments
Standardized protocols are an essential asset for research requiring the maintenance of live organisms. Ecological studies often involve collaborations between multiple teams that are spread across locations, and these collaborations benefit from sharing successful laboratory procedures. Our research team is studying the ecology of the fall webworm moth (Hyphantria cunea, hereafter FW) in North America for >10 years, during which time we have established reliable procedures for starting and maintaining FW colonies under laboratory conditions. FW is a North American species that has been introduced to Europe and Asia where it is a major pest. Here, we present a detailed review of the methods we use to find and collect FW caterpillars in the field, house and rear caterpillars in the laboratory, handle pupae, and initiate diapause for overwintering. We also describe how to end diapause the following summer, care for emerging adult moths and mate them, and tend to eggs. Lastly, we test the effectiveness of some of our protocols related to mating adult moths to determine whether fertile eggs are produced. FW is becoming a model study system for ecological and evolutionary studies related to diet breadth. As more researchers begin studying the ecology and management of FW, more » laboratory colonies will play an important role for these projects. Our protocols will provide guidance to inform the successful study of this important insect. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2030753
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10249529
Journal Name:
University of Denver Undergraduate Research Journal
Volume:
2
Issue:
1
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
75-85
ISSN:
2690-4152
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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