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Title: Pyrochlore nanocrystals as versatile quasi-single-source precursors to lithium conducting garnets
Lithium conducting garnets are attractive solid electrolytes for solid-state lithium batteries but are difficult to process, generally requiring high reaction and sintering temperatures with long durations. In this work, we demonstrate a synthetic route to obtain Ta-doped garnet (Li 6.4 La 3 Zr 1.4 Ta 0.6 O 12 ) utilizing La- and Ta-doped lanthanum zirconate (La 2.4 Zr 1.12 Ta 0.48 O 7.04 ) pyrochlore nanocrystals as quasi-single-source precursors. Via molten salt synthesis (MSS) in a highly basic flux, the pyrochlore nanocrystals transform to Li-garnet at reaction temperatures as low as 400 °C. We also show that the pyrochlore-to-garnet conversion can take place in one step using reactive sintering, resulting in densified garnet ceramics with high ionic conductivity (0.53 mS cm −1 at 21 °C) and relative density (up to 94.7%). This approach opens new avenues for lower temperature synthesis of lithium garnets using a quasi-single-source precursor and provides an alternative route to highly dense garnet solid electrolytes without requiring advanced sintering processes.
Authors:
;
Award ID(s):
1553519
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10251510
Journal Name:
Journal of Materials Chemistry A
Volume:
8
Issue:
34
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
17405 to 17410
ISSN:
2050-7488
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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