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Title: Achieving high circularly polarized luminescence with push–pull helicenic systems: from rationalized design to top-emission CP-OLED applications
While the development of chiral molecules displaying circularly polarized luminescence (CPL) has received considerable attention, the corresponding CPL intensity, g lum, hardly exceeds 10 −2 at the molecular level owing to the difficulty in optimizing the key parameters governing such a luminescence process. To address this challenge, we report here the synthesis and chiroptical properties of a new family of π-helical push–pull systems based on carbo[6]helicene, where the latter acts as either a chiral electron acceptor or a donor unit. This comprehensive experimental and theoretical investigation shows that the magnitude and relative orientation of the electric ( μe ) and magnetic (μ m ) dipole transition moments can be tuned efficiently with regard to the molecular chiroptical properties, which results in high g lum values, i.e. up to 3–4 × 10 −2 . Our investigations revealed that the optimized mutual orientation of the electric and magnetic dipoles in the excited state is a crucial parameter to achieve intense helicene-mediated exciton coupling, which is a major contributor to the obtained strong CPL. Finally, top-emission CP-OLEDs were fabricated through vapor deposition, which afforded a promising g El of around 8 × 10 −3 . These results bring about further molecular design guidelines more » to reach high CPL intensity and offer new insights into the development of innovative CP-OLED architectures. « less
Authors:
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Award ID(s):
1855470
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10253416
Journal Name:
Chemical Science
Volume:
12
Issue:
15
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5522 to 5533
ISSN:
2041-6520
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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