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Title: Dynamic Nuclear Polarization Enhanced Nuclear Spin Optical Rotation
Abstract

Nuclear spin optical rotation (NSOR) has been investigated as a magneto‐optical effect, which holds the potential for applications, including hybrid optical‐nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and gradientless imaging. The intrinsic nature of NSOR renders its detection relatively insensitive, which has prevented it moving from a proof of concept to a method supporting chemical characterizations. In this work, the dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization technique is introduced to provide nuclear spin polarization, increasing the signal‐to‐noise ratio by several thousand times. NSOR signals of1H and19F nuclei are observed in a single scan for diluted compounds, which has made this effect suitable for the determination of electronic transitions from a specific nucleus in a large molecule.

 
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Award ID(s):
1404548
NSF-PAR ID:
10256769
Author(s) / Creator(s):
 ;  ;  
Publisher / Repository:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Angewandte Chemie International Edition
Volume:
60
Issue:
16
ISSN:
1433-7851
Page Range / eLocation ID:
p. 8823-8826
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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