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Title: Ligand‐Protected Ultrasmall Pd Nanoclusters Supported on Metal Oxide Surfaces for CO Oxidation: Does the Ligand Activate or Passivate the Pd Nanocatalyst?
Authors:
 ;  ;  ;  
Award ID(s):
1900094
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10257649
Journal Name:
ChemPhysChem
Volume:
22
Issue:
3
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
p. 312-322
ISSN:
1439-4235
Publisher:
Wiley Blackwell (John Wiley & Sons)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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