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Title: A relationship between stellar metallicity gradients and galaxy age in dwarf galaxies
ABSTRACT We explore the origin of stellar metallicity gradients in simulated and observed dwarf galaxies. We use FIRE-2 cosmological baryonic zoom-in simulations of 26 isolated galaxies as well as existing observational data for 10 Local Group dwarf galaxies. Our simulated galaxies have stellar masses between 105.5 and 108.6 M⊙. Whilst gas-phase metallicty gradients are generally weak in our simulated galaxies, we find that stellar metallicity gradients are common, with central regions tending to be more metal-rich than the outer parts. The strength of the gradient is correlated with galaxy-wide median stellar age, such that galaxies with younger stellar populations have flatter gradients. Stellar metallicty gradients are set by two competing processes: (1) the steady ‘puffing’ of old, metal-poor stars by feedback-driven potential fluctuations and (2) the accretion of extended, metal-rich gas at late times, which fuels late-time metal-rich star formation. If recent star formation dominates, then extended, metal-rich star formation washes out pre-existing gradients from the ‘puffing’ process. We use published results from ten Local Group dwarf galaxies to show that a similar relationship between age and stellar metallicity-gradient strength exists among real dwarfs. This suggests that observed stellar metallicity gradients may be driven largely by the baryon/feedback cycle rather than more » by external environmental effects. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1752913 1910346 1715216 1910965 2108318
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10258065
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
501
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
5121 to 5134
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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