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Title: Understanding Rules in Live Streaming Micro Communities on Twitch
Rules and norms are critical to community governance. Live streaming communities like Twitch consist of thousands of micro-communities called channels. We conducted two studies to understand the micro-community rules. Study one suggests that Twitch users perceive that both rules transparency and communication frequency matter to channel vibe and frequency of harassment. Study two finds that the most popular channels have no channel or chat rules; among these having rules, rules encouraged by streamers are prominent. We explain why this may happen and how this contributes to community moderation and future research.
Authors:
; ;
Award ID(s):
1928627
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10259959
Journal Name:
IMX '21: ACM International Conference on Interactive Media Experiences
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
290 - 295
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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