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Title: A SAMI and MaNGA view on the stellar kinematics of galaxies on the star-forming main sequence
ABSTRACT Galaxy internal structure growth has long been accused of inhibiting star formation in disc galaxies. We investigate the potential physical connection between the growth of dispersion-supported stellar structures (e.g. classical bulges) and the position of galaxies on the star-forming main sequence at z ∼ 0. Combining the might of the SAMI and MaNGA galaxy surveys, we measure the λRe spin parameter for 3289 galaxies over $9.5 \lt \log M_{\star } [\rm {M}_{\odot }] \lt 12$. At all stellar masses, galaxies at the locus of the main sequence possess λRe values indicative of intrinsically flattened discs. However, above $\log M_{\star }[\rm {M}_{\odot }]\sim 10.5$ where the main sequence starts bending, we find tantalizing evidence for an increase in the number of galaxies with dispersion-supported structures, perhaps suggesting a connection between bulges and the bending of the main sequence. Moving above the main sequence, we see no evidence of any change in the typical spin parameter in galaxies once gravitationally interacting systems are excluded from the sample. Similarly, up to 1 dex below the main sequence, λRe remains roughly constant and only at very high stellar masses ($\log M_{\star }[\rm {M}_{\odot }]\gt 11$), do we see a rapid decrease in λRe more » once galaxies decline in star formation activity. If this trend is confirmed, it would be indicative of different quenching mechanisms acting on high- and low-mass galaxies. The results suggest that whilst a population of galaxies possessing some dispersion-supported structure is already present on the star-forming main sequence, further growth would be required after the galaxy has quenched to match the kinematic properties observed in passive galaxies at z ∼ 0. « less
Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
2009416
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10265907
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Volume:
503
Issue:
4
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
4992 to 5005
ISSN:
0035-8711
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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