skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 5:00 PM ET until 11:00 PM ET on Friday, June 21 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Contextual Subspace Variational Quantum Eigensolver
We describe the contextual subspace variational quantum eigensolver (CS-VQE), a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm for approximating the ground state energy of a Hamiltonian. The approximation to the ground state energy is obtained as the sum of two contributions. The first contribution comes from a noncontextual approximation to the Hamiltonian, and is computed classically. The second contribution is obtained by using the variational quantum eigensolver (VQE) technique to compute a contextual correction on a quantum processor. In general the VQE computation of the contextual correction uses fewer qubits and measurements than the VQE computation of the original problem. Varying the number of qubits used for the contextual correction adjusts the quality of the approximation. We simulate CS-VQE on tapered Hamiltonians for small molecules, and find that the number of qubits required to reach chemical accuracy can be reduced by more than a factor of two. The number of terms required to compute the contextual correction can be reduced by more than a factor of ten, without the use of other measurement reduction schemes. This indicates that CS-VQE is a promising approach for eigenvalue computations on noisy intermediate-scale quantum devices.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1818914
NSF-PAR ID:
10273859
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Quantum
Volume:
5
ISSN:
2521-327X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
456
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Quantum chemistry is a promising application for noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) devices. However, quantum computers have thus far not succeeded in providing solutions to problems of real scientific significance, with algorithmic advances being necessary to fully utilise even the modest NISQ machines available today. We discuss a method of ground state energy estimation predicated on a partitioning the molecular Hamiltonian into two parts: one that is noncontextual and can be solved classically, supplemented by a contextual component that yields quantum corrections obtained via a Variational Quantum Eigensolver (VQE) routine. This approach has been termed Contextual Subspace VQE (CS-VQE), but there are obstacles to overcome before it can be deployed on NISQ devices. The problem we address here is that of the ansatz - a parametrized quantum state over which we optimize during VQE. It is not initially clear how a splitting of the Hamiltonian should be reflected in our CS-VQE ansätze. We propose a 'noncontextual projection' approach that is illuminated by a reformulation of CS-VQE in the stabilizer formalism. This defines an ansatz restriction from the full electronic structure problem to the contextual subspace and facilitates an implementation of CS-VQE that may be deployed on NISQ devices. We validate the noncontextual projection ansatz using a quantum simulator, with results obtained herein for a suite of trial molecules. 
    more » « less
  2. Variational Quantum Algorithms (VQAs) rely upon the iterative optimization of a parameterized unitary circuit with respect to an objective function. Since quantum machines are noisy and expensive resources, it is imperative to choose a VQA's ansatz appropriately and its initial parameters to be close to optimal. This work tackles the problem of finding initial ansatz parameters by proposing CAFQA, a Clifford ansatz for quantum accuracy. The CAFQA ansatz is a hardware-efficient circuit built with only Clifford gates. In this ansatz, the initial parameters for the tunable gates are chosen by searching efficiently through the Clifford parameter space via classical simulation, thereby producing a suitable stabilizer state. The stabilizer states produced are shown to always equal or outperform traditional classical initialization (e.g., Hartree-Fock), and often produce high accuracy estimations prior to quantum exploration. Furthermore, the technique is classically suited since a) Clifford circuits can be exactly simulated classically in polynomial time and b) the discrete Clifford space, while scaling exponentially in the number of qubits, is searched efficiently via Bayesian Optimization. For the Variational Quantum Eigensolver (VQE) task of molecular ground state energy estimation up to 20 qubits, CAFQA's Clifford Ansatz achieves a mean accuracy of near 99%, recovering as much as 99.99% of the correlation energy over Hartree-Fock. Notably, the scalability of the approach allows for preliminary ground state energy estimation of the challenging Chromium dimer with an accuracy greater than Hartree-Fock. With CAFQA's initialization, VQA convergence is accelerated by a factor of 2.5x. In all, this work shows that stabilizer states are an accurate ansatz initialization for VQAs. Furthermore, it highlights the potential for quantum-inspired classical techniques to support VQAs. 
    more » « less
  3. Classical computing plays a critical role in the advancement of quantum frontiers in the NISQ era. In this spirit, this work uses classical simulation to bootstrap Variational Quantum Algorithms (VQAs). VQAs rely upon the iterative optimization of a parameterized unitary circuit (ansatz) with respect to an objective function. Since quantum machines are noisy and expensive resources, it is imperative to classically choose the VQA ansatz initial parameters to be as close to optimal as possible to improve VQA accuracy and accelerate their convergence on today’s devices. This work tackles the problem of finding a good ansatz initialization, by proposing CAFQA, a Clifford Ansatz For Quantum Accuracy. The CAFQA ansatz is a hardware-efficient circuit built with only Clifford gates. In this ansatz, the parameters for the tunable gates are chosen by searching efficiently through the Clifford parameter space via classical simulation. The resulting initial states always equal or outperform traditional classical initialization (e.g., Hartree-Fock), and enable high-accuracy VQA estimations. CAFQA is well-suited to classical computation because: a) Clifford-only quantum circuits can be exactly simulated classically in polynomial time, and b) the discrete Clifford space is searched efficiently via Bayesian Optimization. For the Variational Quantum Eigensolver (VQE) task of molecular ground state energy estimation (up to 18 qubits), CAFQA’s Clifford Ansatz achieves a mean accuracy of nearly 99% and recovers as much as 99.99% of the molecular correlation energy that is lost in Hartree-Fock initialization. CAFQA achieves mean accuracy improvements of 6.4x and 56.8x, over the state-of-the-art, on different metrics. The scalability of the approach allows for preliminary ground state energy estimation of the challenging chromium dimer (Cr2) molecule. With CAFQA’s high-accuracy initialization, the convergence of VQAs is shown to accelerate by 2.5x, even for small molecules. Furthermore, preliminary exploration of allowing a limited number of non-Clifford (T) gates in the CAFQA framework, shows that as much as 99.9% of the correlation energy can be recovered at bond lengths for which Clifford-only CAFQA accuracy is relatively limited, while remaining classically simulable. 
    more » « less
  4. Quantum simulations of electronic structure with a transformed Hamiltonian that includes some electron correlation effects are demonstrated. The transcorrelated Hamiltonian used in this work is efficiently constructed classically, at polynomial cost, by an approximate similarity transformation with an explicitly correlated two-body unitary operator. This Hamiltonian is Hermitian, includes no more than two-particle interactions, and is free of electron–electron singularities. We investigate the effect of such a transformed Hamiltonian on the accuracy and computational cost of quantum simulations by focusing on a widely used solver for the Schrödinger equation, namely the variational quantum eigensolver method, based on the unitary coupled cluster with singles and doubles (q-UCCSD) Ansatz. Nevertheless, the formalism presented here translates straightforwardly to other quantum algorithms for chemistry. Our results demonstrate that a transcorrelated Hamiltonian, paired with extremely compact bases, produces explicitly correlated energies comparable to those from much larger bases. For the chemical species studied here, explicitly correlated energies based on an underlying 6-31G basis had cc-pVTZ quality. The use of the very compact transcorrelated Hamiltonian reduces the number of CNOT gates required to achieve cc-pVTZ quality by up to two orders of magnitude, and the number of qubits by a factor of three. 
    more » « less
  5. null (Ed.)
    Simulation of quantum systems is challenging due to the exponential size of the state space. Tensor networks provide a systematically improvable approximation for quantum states. 2D tensor networks such as Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS) are well-suited for key classes of physical systems and quantum circuits. However, direct contraction of PEPS networks has exponential cost, while approximate algorithms require computations with large tensors. We propose new scalable algorithms and software abstractions for PEPS-based methods, accelerating the bottleneck operation of contraction and refactorization of a tensor subnetwork. We employ randomized SVD with an implicit matrix to reduce cost and memory footprint asymptotically. Further, we develop a distributed-memory PEPS library and study accuracy and efficiency of alternative algorithms for PEPS contraction and evolution on the Stampede2 supercomputer. We also simulate a popular near-term quantum algorithm, the Variational Quantum Eigensolver (VQE), and benchmark Imaginary Time Evolution (ITE), which compute ground states of Hamiltonians. 
    more » « less