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Title: Metagenome-Assembled Genome Sequences of Raphidiopsis raciborskii and Planktothrix agardhii from a Cyanobacterial Bloom in Kissena Lake, New York, USA
Raphidiopsis raciborskii and Planktothrix agardhii are filamentous, poten- tially toxin-producing cyanobacteria that form nuisance blooms in fresh waters. Here, we report high-quality metagenome-assembled genome sequences of R. raciborskii and P. agardhii collected from a bloom in Kissena Lake, New York.
Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1840715
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10275079
Journal Name:
Microbiology resource announcements
Volume:
10
Page Range or eLocation-ID:
e01380-20
ISSN:
2576-098X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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