skip to main content

Attention:

The NSF Public Access Repository (NSF-PAR) system and access will be unavailable from 11:00 PM ET on Friday, April 12 until 2:00 AM ET on Saturday, April 13 due to maintenance. We apologize for the inconvenience.


Title: Gut Microbiomes of Freshwater Mussels (Unionidae) Are Taxonomically and Phylogenetically Variable across Years but Remain Functionally Stable
Freshwater mussels perform essential ecosystem functions, yet we have no information on how their microbiomes fluctuate over time. In this study, we examined temporal variation in the microbiome of six mussel species (Lampsilis ornata, Obovaria unicolor, Elliptio arca, Fusconaia cerina, Cyclonaias asperata, and Tritogonia verrucosa) sampled from the same river in 2016 and 2019. We examined the taxonomic, phylogenetic, and inferred functional (from 16S rRNA sequences) facets of their microbiome diversity. Significant differences between the two years were identified in five of the six species sampled. However, not all species that exhibited a temporally variable microbiome were functionally distinct across years, indicating functional redundancy within the mussel gut microbiome. Inferred biosynthesis pathways showed temporal variation in pathways involved in degradation, while pathways involved in cellular metabolism were stable. There was no evidence for phylosymbiosis across any facet of microbiome biodiversity. These results indicate that temporal variation is an important factor in the assembly of the gut microbiomes of freshwater mussels and provides further support that the mussel gut microbiome is involved in host development and activity.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1831512 1831531
NSF-PAR ID:
10276280
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Microorganisms
Volume:
9
Issue:
2
ISSN:
2076-2607
Page Range / eLocation ID:
411
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
More Like this
  1. Abstract

    Freshwater mussels are important for nutrient cycling and ecosystem health as they filter feed on their surrounding water. This filter feeding makes these bivalves especially sensitive to conditions in their environment. Gut microbial communities (microbiomes) have been recognised as important to both host organism and ecosystem health; however, how freshwater mussel microbiomes are organised and influenced is unclear.

    In this study, the gut bacterial microbiome of Threeridge mussel,Amblema plicata, was compared across two river basins, five rivers, and nine local sites in the south‐eastern U.S.A. Mussel gut tissue was dissected, DNA extracted, and the microbiome characterised by high throughput sequencing of the V4 region of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene.

    Planctomycetes, Firmicutes, and Cyanobacteria were the most common bacterial phyla within the guts of all sampledA.plicata. However, the relative abundances of these major bacterial phyla differed between mussels sampled from different rivers and river basins, as did the relative abundance of specific bacterial operational taxonomic units (OTUs). Despite these differences, a core microbiome was identified across all mussels, with eight OTUs being consistent members of theA.plicatamicrobiome at all sites, the most abundant OTU identifying as a member of the family Planctomycetaceae. Geographic distance between sites was not correlated with similarity in the structure of the gut microbiome, which was more related to site physicochemistry.

    Overall, these results suggest that while physicochemical conditions affect the composition of transient bacteria in the Threeridge mussel gut microbiome, the core microbiome is largely unaffected, and a portion of theA.plicatamicrobiome is retained regardless of the river system.

    How long transient bacteria remain in the gut, and to what extent these transient microbes aid in host function is still unknown. Core microbiota have been found to aid in multiple functions within animal hosts, and within freshwater mussels this core microbiome may aid in nutrient processing and cycling. Therefore, it is important to look at both transient and core microbes when studying the structure of freshwater invertebrate microbiomes.

     
    more » « less
  2. The Asian clam Corbicula fluminea (Family: Cyneridae) has aggressively invaded freshwater habitats worldwide, resulting in dramatic ecological changes and declines of native bivalves such as freshwater mussels (Family: Unionidae), one of the most imperiled faunal groups. Despite increases in our knowledge of invasive C. fluminea biology, little is known of how intrinsic and extrinsic factors, including co-occurring native species, influence its microbiome. We investigated the gut bacterial microbiome across genetically differentiated populations of C. fluminea in the Tennessee and Mobile River Basins in the Southeastern United States and compared them to those of six co-occurring species of native freshwater mussels. The gut microbiome of C. fluminea was diverse, differed with environmental conditions and varied spatially among rivers, but was unrelated to host genetic variation. Microbial source tracking suggested that the gut microbiome of C. fluminea may be influenced by the presence of co-occurring native mussels. Inferred functions from 16S rRNA gene data using PICRUST2 predicted a high prevalence and diversity of degradation functions in the C. fluminea microbiome, especially the degradation of carbohydrates and aromatic compounds. Such modularity and functional diversity of the microbiome of C. fluminea may be an asset, allowing to acclimate to an extensive range of nutritional sources in invaded habitats, which could play a vital role in its invasive success. 
    more » « less
  3. Abstract

    The blue mussel (Mytilus edulis) is a suspension feeder which has been used in gut‐microbiome surveys. Although raw 16S sequence data are often publicly available, unifying secondary analyses are lacking. The present work analysed raw data from seven projects conducted by one group over 7 years. Although each project had different motivations, experimental designs and conclusions, all selected samples were from the guts ofM. eduliscollected from a single location in Long Island Sound. The goal of this analysis was to determine which independent factors (e.g., collection date, depuration status) were responsible for governing composition and diversity in the gut microbiomes. Results indicated that whether mussels had undergone depuration, defined here as voidance of faeces in a controlled, no‐food period, was the primary factor that governed gut microbiome composition. Gut microbiomes from non‐depurated mussels were mixtures of resident and transient communities and were influenced by temporal factors. Resident communities from depurated mussels were influenced by the final food source and length of time host mussels were held under laboratory conditions. These findings reinforce the paradigm that gut microbiota are divided into resident and transient components and suggest that depuration status should be taken into consideration when designing and interpreting future experiments.

     
    more » « less
  4. Abstract

    Suspension‐feeding bivalves are critical members of aquatic ecosystems worldwide, which is why research into their host‐associated microbiota is growing. Experiments that artificially diminish the native microbial communities of bivalvesin vivowill be increasingly necessary to evaluate the functional role of microbes within their hosts. Previous methods to manipulate the microbiome of bivalves lack standardization and, often, verification of successful disturbance. The goal of this study was to evaluate antibiotic administration as a method for perturbing the gut microbiome of bivalves in two separate, but related, experiments. In the first, a mixture of antibiotics was delivered to eastern oysters for 4 days to probe effects on gut microbial carbon usage, diversity, and taxonomic composition. In the second, the same antibiotic mixture was administered to blue mussels for 21 days to probe effects on microbial abundance, diversity, and taxonomic composition. In both experiments, animals were administered antibiotics in isolation, and stringent sterilization methods were employed, which included sterilized seawater and microalgal food. The results of the oyster experiment revealed that antibiotics substantially reduced microbial carbon usage and perturbed community composition. In the mussel experiment, antibiotics lowered microbial abundance and species richness and significantly altered community composition. Taken together, results from the two experiments demonstrate that antibiotics can be used to effectively alter the function and composition of the gut microbial community of bivalves. Future research that aims to perturb the microbiomes of suspension‐feeding animals should incorporate aspects similar to the protocols described herein. Additionally, future studies must include verification, ideally high‐throughput DNA sequencing coupled with microbial quantification, that the antibiotic perturbation was successful.

     
    more » « less
  5. Rudi, Knut (Ed.)
    ABSTRACT As rising temperatures threaten biodiversity across the globe, tropical ectotherms are thought to be particularly vulnerable due to their narrow thermal tolerance ranges. Nevertheless, physiology-based models highlighting the vulnerability of tropical organisms rarely consider the contributions of their gut microbiota, even though microbiomes influence numerous host traits, including thermal tolerance. We combined field and lab experiments to understand the response of the slender anole lizard ( Anolis apletophallus ) gut microbiome to climatic shifts of various magnitude and duration. First, to examine the effects of long-term climate warming in the wild, we transplanted lizards from the mainland Panama to a series of warmer islands in the Panama Canal and compared their gut microbiome compositions after three generations of divergence. Next, we mimicked the effects of a short-term “heat-wave” by using a greenhouse experiment and explored the link between gut microbiome composition and lizard thermal physiology. Finally, we examined variation in gut microbiomes in our mainland population in the years both before and after a naturally occurring drought. Our results suggest that slender anole microbiomes are surprisingly resilient to short-term warming. However, both the taxonomic and predicted functional compositions of the gut microbiome varied by sampling year across all sites, suggesting that the drought may have had a regional effect. We provide evidence that short-term heat waves may not substantially affect the gut microbiota, while more sustained climate anomalies may have effects at broad geographic scales. IMPORTANCE As climate change progresses, it is crucial to understand how animals will respond to shifts in their local environments. One component of this response involves changes in the microbial communities living in and on host organisms. These “microbiomes” can affect many processes that contribute to host health and survival, yet few studies have measured changes in the microbiomes of wild organisms experiencing novel climatic conditions. We examined the effects of shifting climates on the gut microbiome of the slender anole lizard ( Anolis apletophallus ) by using a combination of field and laboratory studies, including transplants to warm islands in the Panama Canal. We found that slender anole microbiomes remain stable in response to short-term warming but may be sensitive to sustained climate anomalies, such as droughts. We discuss the significance of these findings for a species that is considered highly vulnerable to climate change. 
    more » « less