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Title: Computational thinking in elementary classrooms: Using classroom dialogue to measure equitable participation
The increased push for access to computer science (CS) at the K-12 level has been argued as a way to broaden participation in computing. At the elementary level, computational thinking (CT) has been used as a framework for bringing CS ideas into the classroom and educating teachers about how they can integrate CT into their daily instruction. A number of these projects have made equity a central goal of their work by working in schools with diverse racial, linguistic, and economic diversity. However, we know little about whether and how teachers equitably engage students in CT during their classroom instruction– particularly during science and math lessons. In this paper, we present an approach to analyzing classroom instructional videos using the EQUIP tool (https://www.equip.ninja/). The purpose of this tool is to examine the quantity and quality of students’ contributions during CT-integrated math and science lessons and how it differs based on demographic markers. We highlight this approach using classroom video observation from four teachers and discuss future work in this area.
Authors:
Award ID(s):
1738677
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10278836
Journal Name:
Proceedings of the Research in Equity and Sustained Participation in Engineering (RESPECT)
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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