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This content will become publicly available on July 22, 2022

Title: A QuantCrit Investigation of Society’s Educational Debts Due to Racism and Sexism in Chemistry Student Learning
The American Chemical Society holds supporting diverse student populations engaging in chemistry as a core value. We analyzed chemical concept inventory scores from 4,612 students across 12 institutions to determine what inequities in content knowledge existed before and after introductory college chemistry courses. We interpreted our findings from a Quantitative Critical (QuantCrit) perspective that framed inequities as educational debts that society owed students due to racism, sexism, or both. Results showed that society owed women and Black men large educational debts before and after instruction. Society’s educational debts before instruction were large enough that women and Black men’s average scores were lower than White men’s average pretest scores even after instruction. Society would have to provide opportunities equivalent to taking the course up to two and a half times to repay the largest educational debts. These findings show the scale of the inequities in the science education systems and highlight the need for reallocating resources and opportunities throughout the K-16 education system to mitigate, prevent, and repay society’s educational debts from sexism and racism.
Authors:
; ; ; ;
Award ID(s):
1928596
Publication Date:
NSF-PAR ID:
10280278
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Education
ISSN:
0021-9584
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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