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Title: Physicochemical properties of respiratory droplets and their role in COVID-19 pandemics: a critical review
The ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is a serious challenge faced by the global community. Physical scientists can help medical workers and biomedical scientists, engineers, and practitioners, who are working on the front line, to slow down and eventually contain the spread of the COVID-19 virus. This review is focused on the physicochemical characteristics, including composition, aerodynamics, and drying behavior of respiratory droplets as a complex and multicomponent soft matter system, which are the main carrier of the virus for interpersonal transmission. The distribution and dynamics of virus particles within a droplet are also discussed. Understanding the characteristics of virus-laden respiratory droplets can lead to better design of personal protective equipment, frequently touched surfaces such as door knobs and touchscreens, and filtering equipment for indoor air circulation. Such an understanding also provides the scientific basis of public policy, including social distancing rules and public hygiene guidelines, implemented by governments around the world.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1944887
NSF-PAR ID:
10284302
Author(s) / Creator(s):
;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Biomaterials translational
Volume:
2
Issue:
1
ISSN:
2096-112X
Page Range / eLocation ID:
10-18
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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