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Title: Advanced LIGO Laser Systems for O3 and Future Observation Runs
The advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors need high power laser sources with excellent beam quality and low-noise behavior. We present a pre-stabilized laser system with 70 W of output power that was used in the third observing run of the advanced LIGO detectors. Furthermore, the prototype of a 140 W pre-stabilized laser system for future use in the LIGO observatories is described and characterized.  more » « less
Award ID(s):
1912598
NSF-PAR ID:
10284305
Author(s) / Creator(s):
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Date Published:
Journal Name:
Galaxies
Volume:
8
Issue:
4
ISSN:
2075-4434
Page Range / eLocation ID:
84
Format(s):
Medium: X
Sponsoring Org:
National Science Foundation
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